Press & Media

Saffron on Eater
Nov 14, 2022
Heray Spice, The Saffron Specialistby Sophia F. Gottfried Jan 28, 2021, 11:47am EST Illustration by Joules GarciaSaffron is one of the world’s most famous, and famously expensive, spices. But Mohammad Salehi has found, beyond that, Americans don’t know all that much about what he calls the “queen of spices.” When he first tried selling the delicate crimson threads from his family’s farm in Afghanistan to grocery stores, they didn’t bite.MORE ON EATER
Bon Appétit: Where To Buy Saffron You Can Feel Good About - Heray Spice
Nov 14, 2022
Heray Spice imports saffron from a cooperative of 25 farming families from two villages in Herat Province. Salehi knows them all personally, and his company pays on average $400-$500 more per kilo than local traders. He also invests a portion of Heray’s profits in local education. “When I was a boy, every year my family would put half of the income from their saffron crop towards my education,” says Salehi. “I want to help the children of farmers who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford to go to school.” Read More on Bon Appétit
Eater New Gaurd
Nov 14, 2022
Mohammad Salehi sells saffron to more than 100 professional chefs and an increasing number of home cooks, but he’s hesitant to call Heray Spice — the company he founded in Chicago in 2017 — a business. To be sure, Heray is a business, and a fast-growing one at that, but Salehi’s vision reaches beyond turning a profit or introducing Americans to some of the best saffron in the world.  Read more on Eater.com
Heray Saffron Mohammad Salehi
Nov 14, 2022
The company is introducing the coveted spice to the U.S. market while giving Afghan farmers a business model that produces income and supports local schools. Read More on Quality Magazine
Heray Afghanistan Saffron
Nov 14, 2022
It is a warm spring afternoon in Herat Province in western Afghanistan. The winter was unseasonably short, and Mohammad Salehi is concerned that might have affected the sun-loving crops. Read More on EATER.COM
NPR Saffron
Nov 14, 2022
NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Mohammad, an ex-interpreter for the U.S. military, whose company works with Afghan farmers to grow saffron for the U.S. market, about the effects of the Taliban takeover.